There’s nothing quite so fine as a bubbling berry crumble, especially when baked in mini cast iron skillets with plenty of golden crumb topping (my motto: you can never have too much crumble). The filling is jammy, blueberry bliss with a sprinkle of lemon thyme – I absolutely adore pairing herbs with berries for an easy way to elevate summery fruit desserts. A touch of lavender would work beautifully, or go classic with plenty of fresh lemon zest.

Blueberry Skillet Crumbles

Crumbles are the ideal make-ahead dessert too – these can be assembled in the morning and chilled up to one day, baked whenever a craving strikes. Whatever you do, don’t forget to serve up the crumbles still warm, topped with scoops of vanilla bean ice cream.

Blueberry Skillet Crumbles

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Blueberry Skillet Crumbles

  • Yield: 6 mini crumbles

Ingredients

Topping

  • 1/2 cup rolled oats
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1/4 cup light brown sugar
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 3 Tbsp cold unsalted butter, cubed

Filling

  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp arrowroot starch
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 3 cups fresh blueberries
  • 1/2 tsp fresh lemon thyme, minced
  • 1 tsp lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Grease six 3 1/2-inch cast iron skillets and place on a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet. For the crumble topping, whisk together oats, flour, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt in a medium bowl. Cut in butter with a pastry blender or fork until large crumbs form. Keep chilled while preparing filling.
  2. For the filling, whisk together sugar, arrowroot starch, and salt in a medium bowl. Add blueberries, lemon thyme, and lemon juice; toss to combine. Divide filling evenly among skillets (about 1/2 cup per skillet) and sprinkle with chilled topping, pressing gently to adhere. Chill assembled crumbles for at least 1 hour in the refrigerator, or up to 1 day.
  3. Preheat oven to 375Β°F. Bake crumbles for 35 minutes, until filling is bubbling and topping is golden brown. Let cool on a wire rack for 20 minutes before serving with ice cream.

Notes

Mini cast iron skillets available here or on eBay. You can also double the recipe and use an 8-inch square baking pan.


Nutrition

  • Calories: 220
  • Carbohydrates: 40

24 comments

    1. Hi Heather, lemon zest and thyme would be great together! Combine with the sugar in a food processor and give it a quick pulse, and you should be good to go. ????

  1. Perfect timing! I was planning to grill a blueberry cobbler over the weekend and you’ve totally inspired me with your gorgeous crumbles!

  2. I have 3 blueberry bushes that are heavy with fruit. They’re not ripe yet, but I’ll need lots of great blueberry recipes soon! Warm crumbles with ice cream are one of my very favorites!

  3. Hi Laura — I hate when an awesome looking recipe forces me to buy adorable bakeware! I hope you get a commission from Lodge. I just bought 8 of those little pans. I can’t wait to make this.

    One request …. I would love a “click here to print” button that just prints the recipe and doesn’t create a 14-page document.

    Love your blog πŸ™‚

    Paula

    1. Thanks Paula! I think you will get plenty of use out of the skillets, I have some more ideas in mind :).

      Just a tip – if you are looking at the recipe section of the post, there is a Print button to the right of the ingredients. I’ll try to make it larger so it’s easier to find. πŸ™‚

      1. I found it, thanks!

        Percy Street BBQ in Philadelphia serves super-delicious corn bread in those skillets…. I justified the purchase with cornbread as another time to use them.

  4. Oh wow, those skillets are totally adorable… I just made a huge blueberry crumble in a full-sized skilled the other day, but now I’m afraid I may just have to join the party and pick up the mini skillets. Thanks for the inspiration!

    1. Thanks Kiran! I like arrowroot starch because it’s healthier than cornstarch and it also makes a nice smooth and shiny sauce :).

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